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Tami Cowden’s The Men We Love, the Women We Want to Be: Using Hero and Heroine Archetypes to Create Dynamic Characters

Tami Cowden, writer of The Complete Writer’s Guide to Heroes and Heroines: Sixteen Literary Archetypes, was in Atlanta recently teaching the workshop The Men We Love, the Women We Want to Be: Using Hero and Heroine Archetypes to Create Dynamic Characters. The day course was organized by the Georgia Romance Writers group.  

Cowden provided great insight on how to use different men and women archetypes to build our characters.
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Building Your Imaginary World

By Mayra Cuevas

Building Your Imaginary World

Most of my novel is set in an imaginary world. I loved creating it and most days I didn’t want to leave it.

When I began building my world I compiled a list of key elements that I needed to tell my story, based on the needs of the characters, their story arch and the plot line. But as I came to find out, I was only scratching the surface.

I knew that my world building couldn’t be gratuitous. In today’s book market editors and readers have little to no patience for long stretches of narrative that build a world but do nothing to advance the story. But I also realized that my world wasn’t living up to its full potential.The initial brainstorming was very helpful as a starting point but it was really a list of disjointed ideas.

I needed a plan. So I went to the Barnes and Noble behind my house and sat in front of the fiction writing section. There I found “The Writer’s Digest Guide to Science Fiction & Fantasy” by Orson Scott Card and the editors of Writer’s Digest.
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Research at the Museum, Step-by-Step Guide

By Mayra Cuevas

Recently, I had the opportunity to do research at the prestigious British Museum in London.

I am a big proponent of accuracy in fiction. Accuracy not only makes your story more believable but it adds a layer of detail that makes the story come to life for the reader.

Since I was going to England for two weeks for a meditation retreat in the Lake District, I decided to add an extra week in London to do research for my book. My fiancé suggested I contact the British Museum, since some years ago he had been on a similar trip to London’s Imperial War Museum for the purpose of researching a screenplay.

If you are setting your sights on using a museum as one of your research tools, this post will explain how to reach the museum curators, how to organize your visit and what resources are available. I will be using my experience with the British Museum as an example, but you can use this post as a guideline to reach out to other museums.
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